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Proterra’s ZX5 next-generation electric transit bus

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Proterra has sold electric buses to over 120 customers in North America—more than any other manufacturer, the company claims. Now Proterra has introduced its fifth-generation battery-electric transit vehicle, the Proterra ZX5 electric bus.

The ZX5 is available in 35-foot and 40-foot versions, and with battery capacity of 220, 440 or 660 kWh. The 660 kWh option (40-foot version only) delivers up to 329 miles of range.

Compared to Proterra’s previous generation, the new ZX5 features a more streamlined body design, a lower vehicle height, new shocks and enhanced ergonomics designed to provide riders and drivers with a smoother riding experience. There’s also an additional front charging port for greater flexibility.

The ZX5 also offers faster acceleration and greater horsepower than earlier Proterra models. It can be configured with Proterra’s standard ProDrive drivetrain or its dual-motor DuoPower drivetrain. Proterra says its DuoPower drivetrain delivers nearly twice the horsepower and five times better fuel efficiency than a standard diesel engine. The DuoPower drivetrain’s two electric motors deliver 550 hp, accelerating a ZX5 bus from 0-20 mph in under six seconds. The DuoPower drivetrain can also propel a bus up a 25% grade, making it a good option for routes with steep hills.

Proterra’s battery systems are designed and manufactured at Proterra’s California battery manufacturing facility, and have logged over 13 million miles in mass transit service.

“A decade ago, Proterra delivered its first battery-electric transit bus. We were at the start of the transportation electrification revolution in North America,” said Proterra CEO Jack Allen. “As more cities and states make the commitment to 100% zero-emission fleets, Proterra is introducing new vehicle and battery technology to meet the needs of our customers. Our fifth-generation electric transit vehicle, the Proterra ZX5, is designed to tackle the toughest routes and terrains across North America.”

Source: Proterra

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